Theodore Penleigh Boyd (1890 – 1923) was a British born Australian artist. Penleigh Boyd was a member of the Boyd artistic dynasty: his parents Arthur Merric Boyd (1862–1940) and Emma Minnie Boyd (née à Beckett) were well-known artists of the day, and his brothers included the ceramicist Merric Boyd (1888–1959) and the novelist Martin Boyd (1893–1972). His son Robin Boyd (1919–1971) became a famous and influential architect, educator and social commentator, and his nephews Arthur BoydGuy Boyd and David Boyd became prominent artists. Penleigh Boyd is best known as a landscapist with an accomplished handling of evanescent effects of light. A notable influence was artist E. Phillips Fox, who introduced him to plein air techniques when they were neighbours in Paris in 1912–3.

Born at Penleigh House, WestburyWiltshire in England,  Boyd received his artistic training from his parents and at the National Gallery Art School. He had his first exhibition at the Victorian Artists’ Society at 18, and exhibited at the Royal Academy in London at 21. He won second prize in the Australian Federal Government’s competition for a painting of the site of the new national capital, Canberra. He won the Wynne Prize in 1914 with Landscape. In 1914, with his painting career flourishing, Penleigh purchased a block of land at Warrandyte and built a family home and studio, “The Robins”. The Boyd’s second child John á Beckett Boyd (known to all as Pat) was born in 1915.

Portsea Pier

The Breath of Spring